3 Ways to celebrate International Forest Day 2020

How do you celebrate International Forest Day 2020 today? Here are 3 tips, including some when you are self-isolating.

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Many kind people have been sharing their creative ways in which they are highlighting International Forest Day March 21st 2020. I would like to give you a brief overview of the few that I've picked up on to help you celebrate (please add your ideas or the ones that others have shared with you in our comments section below). 

  1. If you are able to go outside (in Canterbury, UK, it's beautifully sunny at the moment!), you could visit a forest or patch of trees nearby. An interesting read on the benefits of 'forest bathing' (a term derived from Japan) can be found here. 
  2. The United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21 March the International Day of Forests (IDF) in 2012. The Day celebrates and raises awareness of the importance of all types of forests. If you have to or decided to stay at home today, you could watch their virtual programme here. Speakers include David Wilkie, Executive Director, Rights and Communities, Wildlife Conservation Society.
  3. Celebrate International Forest Day by adopting or planting a tree in your neighbourhood!🌲If you decide to plant a tree, please make sure that these are native species. 

I will leave you with two more pieces that have inspired me today: 

Did you know that underwater kelp forests play a crucial role in our oceans by absorbing CO2, providing habitats & protecting coastlines? I learned this from the Aquaculture Stewardship Council today. Then, for those of you who would like to connect to the beautiful wildlife in our world, please find an inspiring photo Essay 'Asia's Forests of Hope' on BirdLife's website here

Wishing everyone of you WildHub community members a Happy International Forest Day 2020 and I hope you are all doing well! 

Thirza Loffeld

WildHub Community Manager, WildTeam UK

My background is mainly in species conservation, education and capacity development. For several years, I researched mother-young interactions in gorillas and chimpanzees, in captivity and the wild. After that, I worked for three years in Indonesia, where I developed and implemented youth ambassador and community engagement programmes on local and regional scales. These programmes are aimed at building conservation capacity and promoting stewardship. I currently conduct my PhD research on the professional development of conservation professionals and work as Community Manager at WildHub.
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