PARTICIPANTS NEEDED: Survey on how conservationists assess evidence

We need your help to complete a survey on how conservationists assess evidence.
PARTICIPANTS NEEDED: Survey on how conservationists assess evidence
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Hi there, my name is Alec Christie from Downing College, University of Cambridge and I'm conducting some research on how conservationists assess different pieces of evidence to make important decisions. We are interested in whether people rate and rank evidence in a consistent way and have designed a questionnaire, which should take 30-45 minutes to complete. So far, we've only had 7 responses so it would be great to get many more.

We ask you to take on the role of a conservationist in a project team trying to restore a seabird population on an island archipelago in Canada. You'll be guided through the tasks with videos and will have the option to complete 1, 2 or 3 tasks – but we would really appreciate it if you could complete all 3!

Please click the link here if you're interested and want to learn more: https://cambridge.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6YcsjXJPNdrCV6K

Thank you!
Alec Christie.

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Go to the profile of Lize Gibson-Hall
16 days ago

Thanks for sharing this Alec. Feel free to add a banner image if you would like! Also, we have our wildhub socials this Wednesday where you can come and talk about this research. Check out the times for these and RSVP here if you are available. 

Go to the profile of Lucy Tallents
8 days ago

Hi Alec, this sounds like useful and interesting research, but it's quite a big ask time-wise!  I wondered if there's something you could do to incentivize people to participate, as at the moment it appears that the only reward is a warm fuzzy feeling of helping your conservation research project  ;)

Could you perhaps create a badge for people to put on their LinkedIn profile if they participate, or offer participants early access to your findings, or links to a couple of learning resources to help them better assess evidence or...?

I remember completing one conservation survey that then placed my datapoint on a plot showing how my answers related to that of other respondents - it was really interesting!  Does anyone else remember it?

Also, many people here in WildHub are fairly early in their conservation careers, and may lack confidence in their evidence-assessing skills.  So you might increase participation by reassuring potential participants that any approach is valid, and that they don't have to be a highly qualified 'expert' for their participation to add value to your research

Go to the profile of Lize Gibson-Hall
2 days ago

Thanks for these suggestions Lucy! I especially love the badge for LinkedIN :)