Jon Fisher

Conservation Science Officer, The Pew Charitable Trusts

About Jon Fisher

Which category below best describes the type of organisation you currently work for/or run?

Charity/Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO)

Areas of expertise

Behaviour change campaigns Research Partnerships and collaboration development Monitoring and evaluation Information technology

Would you be willing to be approached and share your lessons learned in your area(s) of expertise with our community?

Yes

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Recent Conversations

Recent Comments

Jun 10, 2022

Great interview! I've never paid to volunteer, but have done a lot of no-pay and very low pay labor, but also managed volunteers and junior staff. I can say that at least some environmental NGOS are ending unpaid internships given the equity concern (only people with parental support can afford to take them). It's hard to find the right approach with volunteers and very junior staff sometimes. Unless they are either doing unskilled labor or comfortable trying things and working fairly independently, it can sometimes take more time to train them than they save by doing the work. That's no excuse for expecting people to do what should be paid work for free though! I would just encourage people with no experience looking to build it to be open to both 1) experimenting and learning on the job as opposed to being given a lot of guidance up front (it is uncomfortable but helps you learn better) and 2) potentially staying in an entry level position or even volunteer role for a year or two (this will help your supervisor see that it's worth spending their time to invest in you). I've had some 'volunteers' openly say that they wanted me to provide (free) training to them for a few months after which they would move on, which is not very appealing! Best of luck to all.

Apr 15, 2022

I'm wondering how large animals can simultaneously increase sequestration (stimulating more vegetative growth through fertilization and grazing) but also reduce vegetative cover enough to increase albedo by exposing soil. It seems like those two responses to large animals would tend to pull in opposite directions. Is the idea that they are heavily grazing some areas to the ground, temporarily increasing albedo, followed by increasing sequestration (w/o lowering albedo relative to less grazed areas)?

Dec 14, 2021

I forgot to mention that I have a handful of resources on this topic at http://impactblog.sciencejon.com/ - they include a 2 page science brief, a couple of other interviews, video recordings of talks on the subject, etc.

Oct 04, 2021
Replying to Jon Fisher

A few colleagues and I compiled our lessons learned and recommendations for improving the impact of research and put it in an easy to read journal article at http://impact.sciencejon.com/

We also have a few shorter pieces to accompany the article, including videos, a science brief, and some interviews at http://sciencejon.blogspot.com/2020/09/how-scientists-can-improve-their-impact.html

Whatever you prefer is fine.

Oct 01, 2021

A few colleagues and I compiled our lessons learned and recommendations for improving the impact of research and put it in an easy to read journal article at http://impact.sciencejon.com/

We also have a few shorter pieces to accompany the article, including videos, a science brief, and some interviews at http://sciencejon.blogspot.com/2020/09/how-scientists-can-improve-their-impact.html